Keeping Your Skin Moist In Winter Easily

Dry skin can be unsightly or uncomfortable. Drier climates and cold winters can drastically affect the health of your skin. However, a little self-maintenance and a few new habits can prevent your skin from becoming dry, itchy, flaky or even cracking and bleeding. Managing your skin’s health is usually directly related to managing your body’s water content level.

Of course, perhaps rather obviously, drink enough water. Remember that the human body is 50-70% water, slightly decreasing with age. Water evaporates and it evaporates faster under certain conditions. The easiest way to replenish evaporated water is to drink more. The body does not have a built in method of storage for water, as it does for energy in fat. Traditional daily water recommendations for adults is 8 glasses (8 fluid ounces equals a glass) a day. Obviously, any quantities would be averages but other daily dosages are rated by calorie consumption (4.2 glasses per 1,000 kcals) or by weight (0.06 glasses per pound).

In addition, eat foods with a high water content. Fruits and vegetables are the best source of water in foods. Apples, bananas, blueberries, cantaloupe, grapefruit, strawberries and watermelon are a few fruit favorites. Blend these together, add a little orange or other juice, even a little ice and you’re really on your way to superior health. Lettuce, tomatoes, carrots, spinach, eggplant and zucchini are some vegetables with high water content. For perhaps more appetizing, cooked alternatives, choose from jambalaya or gumbo, vegetable soup, pad thai noodle dishes or pho vietnamese soups (cooked noodles and raw veggies), roasted chicken or turkey breast and baked salmon (or other thicker fish fillets).

To further support your body’s water management, avoid ingesting foods and beverages that tend to remove water from the body. Beverages such as coffee, teas, sodas and beer are diuretics, causing you to urinate more frequently and relieve yourself of your (apparently) scarce supply of water. Digesting food requires water, so ingesting large amounts of food will require drinking more water. It is often tempting to imbibe beverages that complement a meal more than your hydration needs. It is wise to always order water with any other beverage, besides, it’s usually free.

If the air inside your home, or outside in your particular climate, is dry or cold, cover your skin whenever possible. Exposing your skin to air that is dryer than your skin causes the water to be sucked out of your skin. A relative humidity below 45-50% will have a noticeable effect. Extreme cold tends to freeze substantial amounts of moisture in the air, rendering it dryer. Some lotions may help protect against the air when applied before going outdoors. Not to mention it will aid in preventing random scratches and cuts while working with your hands during cold or dry times.

Humidifiers and vaporizers are designed to increase the relative humidity indoors. The many devices available have varying specialties. Some have filters to clean dirt and bacteria so it doesn’t get distributed into the air in your home. Wick humidifiers are self-regulating and only put out as much moisture to achieve the specified humidity. Some units have a loud fan that runs continuously, so watch out for the noisemakers if constant noises may be bothersome (when you’re trying to go to sleep). Take care in positioning a humidifier or vaporizer in your room, as direct moisture can damage many electrical or wooden items (don’t put it under your favorite picture or $1200 television). Some central heating and cooling systems come equipped with a humidifier. These built in units are great because they regulate the humidity of the entire home from a central, hard-wired and discrete location. An inexpensive way to increase the humidity in a small, sealed room is to spray a fine mist of water from a spray bottle.

The shower or bath presents another opportunity to lose moisture. Most of us are familiar with the wrinkled effect our skin takes on after remaining in the shower, bath or pool for longer than 20 minutes or so. Our skin absorbs more water than usual, so the wrinkles form to make room for the extra filling. The water evaporates when we step out of the water, the excess taking some of the usual reserves with it. To exacerbate the problem, most commercial soap manufacturers remove the naturally occurring glycerin from their soaps (yes, the same stuff used to make dynamite). Pure glycerin sucks water out of the air, but mixed with water, aids in constraining water to higher levels of saturation. Pure-Castille Soap from Dr. Bronner’s Magic Soaps is an example of a soap used for bathing that does not remove the glycerin.

Of course, there is a huge market based on skin moisturizing through creams and lotions. However, many of these products are only band-aids that cover up a problem rather than addressing the source. Various Eucerin products cater to dry skin repair, though some may have a slightly different consistency than traditional lotions. Many products on the market may work well, but any lotion that tends to require constant use should be avoided. Use your lips as an early indicator of dryness; if you feel the need to use lip balm, try drinking some water instead.

Preventing chronic dry skin, or even the occasional flake fest, is best accomplished by managing the moisture content of your environment and your body. Prepare your home when indoors and protect your exposed skin while outdoors. Maintaining proper hydration through your diet provides a solid foundation for healthy skin. After establishing some new and healthier habits until you are doing them on auto pilot, you should generally have healthy, soft and attractive skin.

Dry skin can be unsightly or uncomfortable. Drier climates and cold winters can drastically affect the health of your skin. However, a little self-maintenance and a few new habits can prevent your skin from becoming dry, itchy, flaky or even cracking and bleeding. Managing your skin’s health is usually directly related to managing your body’s water content level.

Of course, perhaps rather obviously, drink enough water. Remember that the human body is 50-70% water, slightly decreasing with age. Water evaporates and it evaporates faster under certain conditions. The easiest way to replenish evaporated water is to drink more. The body does not have a built in method of storage for water, as it does for energy in fat. Traditional daily water recommendations for adults is 8 glasses (8 fluid ounces equals a glass) a day. Obviously, any quantities would be averages but other daily dosages are rated by calorie consumption (4.2 glasses per 1,000 kcals) or by weight (0.06 glasses per pound).

In addition, eat foods with a high water content. Fruits and vegetables are the best source of water in foods. Apples, bananas, blueberries, cantaloupe, grapefruit, strawberries and watermelon are a few fruit favorites. Blend these together, add a little orange or other juice, even a little ice and you’re really on your way to superior health. Lettuce, tomatoes, carrots, spinach, eggplant and zucchini are some vegetables with high water content. For perhaps more appetizing, cooked alternatives, choose from jambalaya or gumbo, vegetable soup, pad thai noodle dishes or pho vietnamese soups (cooked noodles and raw veggies), roasted chicken or turkey breast and baked salmon (or other thicker fish fillets).

To further support your body’s water management, avoid ingesting foods and beverages that tend to remove water from the body. Beverages such as coffee, teas, sodas and beer are diuretics, causing you to urinate more frequently and relieve yourself of your (apparently) scarce supply of water. Digesting food requires water, so ingesting large amounts of food will require drinking more water. It is often tempting to imbibe beverages that complement a meal more than your hydration needs. It is wise to always order water with any other beverage, besides, it’s usually free.

If the air inside your home, or outside in your particular climate, is dry or cold, cover your skin whenever possible. Exposing your skin to air that is dryer than your skin causes the water to be sucked out of your skin. A relative humidity below 45-50% will have a noticeable effect. Extreme cold tends to freeze substantial amounts of moisture in the air, rendering it dryer. Some lotions may help protect against the air when applied before going outdoors. Not to mention it will aid in preventing random scratches and cuts while working with your hands during cold or dry times.

Humidifiers and vaporizers are designed to increase the relative humidity indoors. The many devices available have varying specialties. Some have filters to clean dirt and bacteria so it doesn’t get distributed into the air in your home. Wick humidifiers are self-regulating and only put out as much moisture to achieve the specified humidity. Some units have a loud fan that runs continuously, so watch out for the noisemakers if constant noises may be bothersome (when you’re trying to go to sleep). Take care in positioning a humidifier or vaporizer in your room, as direct moisture can damage many electrical or wooden items (don’t put it under your favorite picture or $1200 television). Some central heating and cooling systems come equipped with a humidifier. These built in units are great because they regulate the humidity of the entire home from a central, hard-wired and discrete location. An inexpensive way to increase the humidity in a small, sealed room is to spray a fine mist of water from a spray bottle.

The shower or bath presents another opportunity to lose moisture. Most of us are familiar with the wrinkled effect our skin takes on after remaining in the shower, bath or pool for longer than 20 minutes or so. Our skin absorbs more water than usual, so the wrinkles form to make room for the extra filling. The water evaporates when we step out of the water, the excess taking some of the usual reserves with it. To exacerbate the problem, most commercial soap manufacturers remove the naturally occurring glycerin from their soaps (yes, the same stuff used to make dynamite). Pure glycerin sucks water out of the air, but mixed with water, aids in constraining water to higher levels of saturation. Pure-Castille Soap from Dr. Bronner’s Magic Soaps is an example of a soap used for bathing that does not remove the glycerin.

Of course, there is a huge market based on skin moisturizing through creams and lotions. However, many of these products are only band-aids that cover up a problem rather than addressing the source. Various Eucerin products cater to dry skin repair, though some may have a slightly different consistency than traditional lotions. Many products on the market may work well, but any lotion that tends to require constant use should be avoided. Use your lips as an early indicator of dryness; if you feel the need to use lip balm, try drinking some water instead.

Preventing chronic dry skin, or even the occasional flake fest, is best accomplished by managing the moisture content of your environment and your body. Prepare your home when indoors and protect your exposed skin while outdoors. Maintaining proper hydration through your diet provides a solid foundation for healthy skin. After establishing some new and healthier habits until you are doing them on auto pilot, you should generally have healthy, soft and attractive skin.

Dry skin can be unsightly or uncomfortable. Drier climates and cold winters can drastically affect the health of your skin. However, a little self-maintenance and a few new habits can prevent your skin from becoming dry, itchy, flaky or even cracking and bleeding. Managing your skin’s health is usually directly related to managing your body’s water content level.

Of course, perhaps rather obviously, drink enough water. Remember that the human body is 50-70% water, slightly decreasing with age. Water evaporates and it evaporates faster under certain conditions. The easiest way to replenish evaporated water is to drink more. The body does not have a built in method of storage for water, as it does for energy in fat. Traditional daily water recommendations for adults is 8 glasses (8 fluid ounces equals a glass) a day. Obviously, any quantities would be averages but other daily dosages are rated by calorie consumption (4.2 glasses per 1,000 kcals) or by weight (0.06 glasses per pound).

In addition, eat foods with a high water content. Fruits and vegetables are the best source of water in foods. Apples, bananas, blueberries, cantaloupe, grapefruit, strawberries and watermelon are a few fruit favorites. Blend these together, add a little orange or other juice, even a little ice and you’re really on your way to superior health. Lettuce, tomatoes, carrots, spinach, eggplant and zucchini are some vegetables with high water content. For perhaps more appetizing, cooked alternatives, choose from jambalaya or gumbo, vegetable soup, pad thai noodle dishes or pho vietnamese soups (cooked noodles and raw veggies), roasted chicken or turkey breast and baked salmon (or other thicker fish fillets).

To further support your body’s water management, avoid ingesting foods and beverages that tend to remove water from the body. Beverages such as coffee, teas, sodas and beer are diuretics, causing you to urinate more frequently and relieve yourself of your (apparently) scarce supply of water. Digesting food requires water, so ingesting large amounts of food will require drinking more water. It is often tempting to imbibe beverages that complement a meal more than your hydration needs. It is wise to always order water with any other beverage, besides, it’s usually free.

If the air inside your home, or outside in your particular climate, is dry or cold, cover your skin whenever possible. Exposing your skin to air that is dryer than your skin causes the water to be sucked out of your skin. A relative humidity below 45-50% will have a noticeable effect. Extreme cold tends to freeze substantial amounts of moisture in the air, rendering it dryer. Some lotions may help protect against the air when applied before going outdoors. Not to mention it will aid in preventing random scratches and cuts while working with your hands during cold or dry times.

Humidifiers and vaporizers are designed to increase the relative humidity indoors. The many devices available have varying specialties. Some have filters to clean dirt and bacteria so it doesn’t get distributed into the air in your home. Wick humidifiers are self-regulating and only put out as much moisture to achieve the specified humidity. Some units have a loud fan that runs continuously, so watch out for the noisemakers if constant noises may be bothersome (when you’re trying to go to sleep). Take care in positioning a humidifier or vaporizer in your room, as direct moisture can damage many electrical or wooden items (don’t put it under your favorite picture or $1200 television). Some central heating and cooling systems come equipped with a humidifier. These built in units are great because they regulate the humidity of the entire home from a central, hard-wired and discrete location. An inexpensive way to increase the humidity in a small, sealed room is to spray a fine mist of water from a spray bottle.

The shower or bath presents another opportunity to lose moisture. Most of us are familiar with the wrinkled effect our skin takes on after remaining in the shower, bath or pool for longer than 20 minutes or so. Our skin absorbs more water than usual, so the wrinkles form to make room for the extra filling. The water evaporates when we step out of the water, the excess taking some of the usual reserves with it. To exacerbate the problem, most commercial soap manufacturers remove the naturally occurring glycerin from their soaps (yes, the same stuff used to make dynamite). Pure glycerin sucks water out of the air, but mixed with water, aids in constraining water to higher levels of saturation. Pure-Castille Soap from Dr. Bronner’s Magic Soaps is an example of a soap used for bathing that does not remove the glycerin.

Of course, there is a huge market based on skin moisturizing through creams and lotions. However, many of these products are only band-aids that cover up a problem rather than addressing the source. Various Eucerin products cater to dry skin repair, though some may have a slightly different consistency than traditional lotions. Many products on the market may work well, but any lotion that tends to require constant use should be avoided. Use your lips as an early indicator of dryness; if you feel the need to use lip balm, try drinking some water instead.

Preventing chronic dry skin, or even the occasional flake fest, is best accomplished by managing the moisture content of your environment and your body. Prepare your home when indoors and protect your exposed skin while outdoors. Maintaining proper hydration through your diet provides a solid foundation for healthy skin. After establishing some new and healthier habits until you are doing them on auto pilot, you should generally have healthy, soft and attractive skin.

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